Tag Archives: rivermont chiropractor

What is a Subluxation?

The term “subluxation” is used by doctors of chiropractic to depict the altered position of the vertebra and subsequent functional loss, which determines the location for the spinal manipulation “Subluxation” has been defined medically as a partial abnormal separation of the articular surfaces of a joint.

Chiropractors have described the term to include a complex of functions (i.e. the subluxation complex) as an alteration of the biomechanical and physiological dynamics of contiguous structures which can cause neural disturbances.

Chiropractic Viewpoint on Subluxation

Chiropractors view subluxation as a process rather than a static condition during which the tissues undergo constant changes, including:

  • Hyperemia. Referring to an excess of blood in a specific area of the body, hyperemia may develop when there is an obstruction preventing the blood from flowing normally.
  • Congestion. Joint dysfunction affects the muscles in different ways, with some muscles developing trigger points, or areas of congestion, where toxins develop, irritate the nerve endings within the muscle, and produce pain.
  • Edema. When the body’s tiny blood vessels (capillaries) are damaged or pressurized, excess fluid may leak from them and build up in the tissues, leading to a swelling known as edema.
  • Minute hemorrhages. Referring to a small amount of bleeding or an abnormal flow of blood, minute hemorrhages may develop within the body’s blood vessels as a result of certain triggers, underlying conditions and other risk factors.
  • Fibrosis. Detailing the replacement of normal tissue with scar tissue, fibrosis commonly occurs in people dealing with recurrent back pain.
  • Local ischemia. A very specific type of muscle pain, ischemia refers to a lack of blood flow in the muscle (often from a muscle spasm), leaving the muscle very painful to touch.
  • Atrophy. With muscle atrophy, the muscle shrinks and may partially or completely waste away as a result of inactivity or various diseases and conditions.
  • Tissue rigidity. Eventual rigidity and adhesions form not only in joint capsules, but also in ligaments, tendons and muscles themselves.

Spinal Subluxation in Chiropractic

Static Intersegmental Subluxation

  1. Flexion malposition
  2. Extension malposition
  3. Lateral flexion malposition
  4. Rotation malposition
  5. Anterolesthesis
  6. Retrolesthesis
  7. Altered Interosseous Spacing (increased or decreased)
  8. Osseous Foraminal encroachment

Kinetic Intersegmental Subluxation

  1. Hypomobility (fixation subluxation)
  2. Hypermobility (unstable subluxation)
  3. Aberrant motion (paradoxical motion)

Sectional Subluxation

  1. Scoliosis and/or alteration of curves secondary to muscle imbalance
  2. Scoliosis and/or alteration of curves secondary to structural asymmetries
  3. Decompensation of adaptational curves
  4. Abnormalities of motion

Paravertebral Subluxation

  1. Costovertebral or costotransverse disrelationships
  2. Sacroiliac subluxation1

1https://www.spine-health.com/treatment/chiropractic/subluxation-and-chiropractic

Questions? Call me, Dr. Deborah Pearson, a chiropractor serving Alpharetta, Johns Creek, Roswell, and Norcross @ 770-993-3200.

What Are A Chiropractor’s Qualifications?

Chiropractic Qualifications

Educational and licensing requirements for doctors of chiropractic (DCs) are among the most stringent of any of the health care professions.
DCs are educated in nationally accredited, four-year doctoral graduate school programs through a curriculum that includes a minimum of 4,200 hours of classroom, laboratory and clinical internship, with the average DC program equivalent in classroom hours to allopathic (MD) and osteopathic (DO) medical schools.

They are designated as physician-level providers in the vast majority of states and federal Medicare program. The essential services provided by DCs are also available in federal health delivery systems, including those administered by Medicaid, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Department of Defense, the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, Federal Workers’ Compensation, and all state workers’ compensation programs.

Chiropractic Education

The typical applicant at a chiropractic college has already acquired nearly four years of pre-medical undergraduate college education, including courses in biology, inorganic and organic chemistry, physics, psychology and related lab work. Once accepted into an accredited chiropractic college, the requirements become even more demanding — four to five academic years of professional study are the standard. Because of the hands-on nature of chiropractic, and the intricate adjusting techniques, a significant portion of time is spent in clinical training.

Chiropractors undergo a rigorous education in the healing sciences, similar to that of medical doctors. In some areas, such as anatomy, physiology, rehabilitation, nutrition and public health, they receive more intensive education than their MD counterparts. Like other primary health care doctors, chiropractic students spend a significant portion of their curriculum studying clinical subjects related to evaluating and caring for patients. Typically, as part of their professional training, they must complete a minimum of a one-year clinical-based program dealing with actual patient care. In total, the curriculum includes a minimum of 4,200 hours of classroom, laboratory and clinical experience. The course of study is approved by an accrediting agency that is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. This has been the case for more than 25 years.

Certification and Licensure

This extensive education prepares doctors of chiropractic to diagnose health care problems, treat the problems when they are within their scope of practice and refer patients to other health care practitioners when appropriate.

Certification and licensure of chiropractors is governed by the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE).

Chiropractors must pass a national board exam administered by NBCE and then obtain a license in the state in which they wish to practice. Additionally, they must meet yearly continuing education requirements to maintain their license.1

Questions? Call me, Dr. Deborah Pearson, a chiropractor serving Johns Creek, Roswell, Alpharetta, and Norcross @ 770-990-3200.

  1. Chiropractic Qualifications. Retrieved from https://www.acatoday.org/Patients/Why-Choose-Chiropractic/Chiropractic-Qualifications

Should I Exercise Before or After My Adjustment?

I get asked this question often. Should I get adjusted before I work out or should I get adjusted after my workout in case I do something goofy in the gym? I am on the bus that gets my adjustment BEFORE my work out. Here is why…

First, adjustments can give pain relief. Removing pressure on the nerves is going to help a person feel better. When misalignments are corrected in the body it allows for a more efficient workout and allows for increased flexibility.

Second, the muscles should be evenly balanced for optimal health. If a person is having painful symptoms that the chiropractor is working to alleviate, then working out before the adjustment may exacerbate the pain and discomfort. Imagine working out with one high heel on one foot and a sneaker on the other. What would that feel like? This is the equivalent to exercising while the body is out of balance.

Lastly, adjustments help the muscles relax. Tight muscles lead to strains, sprains, tears, and breaks. Relaxed muscles help to avoid injury. Injuries will keep one out of the gym for days, weeks, months, or more.
When in doubt, get adjusted before you go running, play tennis, hit the driving range, bike on the trails, or whatever fun exercise you like to do.

Questions? Call me, Dr. Deborah Pearson, a chiropractor serving Roswell, Johns Creek, and Alpharetta. 770-993-3200