09/13/2016

What makes you happy? Hormones.

What makes you sad? Hormones.

What causes weight fluctuations, bloating and other health symptoms throughout the course of a month? Hormones.

What causes men to naturally put on muscle more easily or lose weight more quickly? Hormones.

What is a huge contributing factor of growth in children? Hormones.

What controls ovulation, reproduction, pregnancy, etc? Hormones.

Endocrine glands make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal glands and pancreas. In addition, men produce hormones in their testes and women produce them in their ovaries. These glands depend on beneficial fats.

The healthy chiropractic lifestyle suggests one choose fats like coconut oil, real butter, olive oil (don’t heat it!) and animal fats (tallow, lard) from healthy sources instead and eat lots of high Omega-3 fish. Don’t eat fats like vegetable oil, peanut oil, canola oil, soybean oil, margarine, shortening, or other chemically altered fats.

So why has fat gotten such a bad rap? It began 50 years ago…

A new article published by NPR and JAMA Internal Medicine reveals that in the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat.
The article draws on internal documents to show that an industry group called the Sugar Research Foundation wanted to “refute” concerns about sugar’s possible role in heart disease.

But in the ’60s, the SRF became aware of “flowing reports that sugar is a less desirable dietary source of calories than other carbohydrates,” as John Hickson, SRF vice president and director of research, put it in one document.

Documents were uncovered that recommended the industry fund its own studies — “Then we can publish the data and refute our detractors. “If Americans could be persuaded to eat a lower-fat diet — for the sake of their health — they would need to replace that fat with something else. America’s per capita sugar consumption could go up by a third. The documents in question are five decades old, but the larger issue is of the moment, as Marion Nestle notes in a commentary in the same issue of JAMA Internal Medicine:

“Is it really true that food companies deliberately set out to manipulate research in their favor? Yes, it is, and the practice continues. In 2015, the New York Times obtained emails revealing Coca-Cola’s cozy relationships with sponsored researchers who were conducting studies aimed at minimizing the effects of sugary drinks on obesity. Even more recently, the Associated Press obtained emails showing how a candy trade association funded and influenced studies to show that children who eat sweets have healthier body weights than those who do not.”

What’s the bottom line…I recommend taking advice with a grain of salt (pun intended). Use common sense when making food choices and before blindly believing in published research find out who is really behind the funding.

Lastly, eat fat and be happy!

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